Wheelbarrow history

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    • #6005
      MikeH
      Participant

      Tried a couple searches, but didn’t see an answer.

      What is the story behind the wheelbarrow at the Columbine Springs/ Limber Pine/ John’s Meadows junction?

    • #6009
      shawnsisler
      Participant

      There seemed to be a camp there at one time. There is a lot old cans and other leftovers from the past. Also near by is Manzanita Springs which is an old cement & rock structure like a trough for horses or cattle. Maybe the wheelbarrow was used to make it?

    • #6010
      shawnsisler
      Participant

      Somebody has been working it lately.

      Wheelbarrow

    • #6014
      MikeH
      Participant

      Thanks Shawn.  Almost positive there was quite of bit of rusted stuff in there when I took at look.  Someone who came after me (per Instagram post timestamp) took a picture of an empty wheelbarrow.  Not sure why they’d remove anything from it, maybe for the pic?, but hopefully they put the stuff back… assuming it was them who emptied it.

    • #6019
      chris in redlands
      Participant

      The wheelbarrow has been there forever. All the cans and stuff people saw in it since the reopening were added during the fire closure by people who found the stuff on the way up there. The empty wheelbarrow been a constant fixture at the junction there for decades. It even disappeared for a while.

      The cans and stuff that recently appeared in the wheelbarrow should never have been there in the first place. The El Dorado fire exposed many artifacts that were hidden prior to the fire. It’s a testament to the lack of foresight on the part of the forest service that a basic archeological survey wasn’t conducted prior to reopening the trail. Remember that anything you find up there that’s more than 50 years old is a historic artifact. Moving or removing it is a crime, per the antiquities act, so take pictures, but leave stuff where it is.

      • #6020
        chris in redlands
        Participant

        Actually, it’s the archaeological resources protection act (ARPA) that protects historic artifacts, not the antiquities act. Got my acts backwards. 🙂

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